Reader.Read does not set a limit on the maximum size of file headers. A maliciously crafted archive could cause Read to allocate unbounded amounts of memory, potentially causing resource exhaustion or panics. After fix, Reader.Read limits the maximum size of header blocks to 1 MiB.
Max CVSS
7.5
EPSS Score
0.12%
Published
2022-10-14
Updated
2023-11-25
Requests forwarded by ReverseProxy include the raw query parameters from the inbound request, including unparsable parameters rejected by net/http. This could permit query parameter smuggling when a Go proxy forwards a parameter with an unparsable value. After fix, ReverseProxy sanitizes the query parameters in the forwarded query when the outbound request's Form field is set after the ReverseProxy. Director function returns, indicating that the proxy has parsed the query parameters. Proxies which do not parse query parameters continue to forward the original query parameters unchanged.
Max CVSS
7.5
EPSS Score
0.16%
Published
2022-10-14
Updated
2023-11-25
Programs which compile regular expressions from untrusted sources may be vulnerable to memory exhaustion or denial of service. The parsed regexp representation is linear in the size of the input, but in some cases the constant factor can be as high as 40,000, making relatively small regexps consume much larger amounts of memory. After fix, each regexp being parsed is limited to a 256 MB memory footprint. Regular expressions whose representation would use more space than that are rejected. Normal use of regular expressions is unaffected.
Max CVSS
7.5
EPSS Score
0.13%
Published
2022-10-14
Updated
2023-11-25
An attacker can cause excessive memory growth in a Go server accepting HTTP/2 requests. HTTP/2 server connections contain a cache of HTTP header keys sent by the client. While the total number of entries in this cache is capped, an attacker sending very large keys can cause the server to allocate approximately 64 MiB per open connection.
Max CVSS
5.3
EPSS Score
0.20%
Published
2022-12-08
Updated
2024-01-18
A maliciously crafted HTTP/2 stream could cause excessive CPU consumption in the HPACK decoder, sufficient to cause a denial of service from a small number of small requests.
Max CVSS
7.5
EPSS Score
1.03%
Published
2023-02-28
Updated
2023-11-25
Large handshake records may cause panics in crypto/tls. Both clients and servers may send large TLS handshake records which cause servers and clients, respectively, to panic when attempting to construct responses. This affects all TLS 1.3 clients, TLS 1.2 clients which explicitly enable session resumption (by setting Config.ClientSessionCache to a non-nil value), and TLS 1.3 servers which request client certificates (by setting Config.ClientAuth >= RequestClientCert).
Max CVSS
7.5
EPSS Score
0.07%
Published
2023-02-28
Updated
2023-11-25
A denial of service is possible from excessive resource consumption in net/http and mime/multipart. Multipart form parsing with mime/multipart.Reader.ReadForm can consume largely unlimited amounts of memory and disk files. This also affects form parsing in the net/http package with the Request methods FormFile, FormValue, ParseMultipartForm, and PostFormValue. ReadForm takes a maxMemory parameter, and is documented as storing "up to maxMemory bytes +10MB (reserved for non-file parts) in memory". File parts which cannot be stored in memory are stored on disk in temporary files. The unconfigurable 10MB reserved for non-file parts is excessively large and can potentially open a denial of service vector on its own. However, ReadForm did not properly account for all memory consumed by a parsed form, such as map entry overhead, part names, and MIME headers, permitting a maliciously crafted form to consume well over 10MB. In addition, ReadForm contained no limit on the number of disk files created, permitting a relatively small request body to create a large number of disk temporary files. With fix, ReadForm now properly accounts for various forms of memory overhead, and should now stay within its documented limit of 10MB + maxMemory bytes of memory consumption. Users should still be aware that this limit is high and may still be hazardous. In addition, ReadForm now creates at most one on-disk temporary file, combining multiple form parts into a single temporary file. The mime/multipart.File interface type's documentation states, "If stored on disk, the File's underlying concrete type will be an *os.File.". This is no longer the case when a form contains more than one file part, due to this coalescing of parts into a single file. The previous behavior of using distinct files for each form part may be reenabled with the environment variable GODEBUG=multipartfiles=distinct. Users should be aware that multipart.ReadForm and the http.Request methods that call it do not limit the amount of disk consumed by temporary files. Callers can limit the size of form data with http.MaxBytesReader.
Max CVSS
7.5
EPSS Score
0.07%
Published
2023-02-28
Updated
2023-11-25
HTTP and MIME header parsing can allocate large amounts of memory, even when parsing small inputs, potentially leading to a denial of service. Certain unusual patterns of input data can cause the common function used to parse HTTP and MIME headers to allocate substantially more memory than required to hold the parsed headers. An attacker can exploit this behavior to cause an HTTP server to allocate large amounts of memory from a small request, potentially leading to memory exhaustion and a denial of service. With fix, header parsing now correctly allocates only the memory required to hold parsed headers.
Max CVSS
7.5
EPSS Score
0.12%
Published
2023-04-06
Updated
2023-11-25
Multipart form parsing can consume large amounts of CPU and memory when processing form inputs containing very large numbers of parts. This stems from several causes: 1. mime/multipart.Reader.ReadForm limits the total memory a parsed multipart form can consume. ReadForm can undercount the amount of memory consumed, leading it to accept larger inputs than intended. 2. Limiting total memory does not account for increased pressure on the garbage collector from large numbers of small allocations in forms with many parts. 3. ReadForm can allocate a large number of short-lived buffers, further increasing pressure on the garbage collector. The combination of these factors can permit an attacker to cause an program that parses multipart forms to consume large amounts of CPU and memory, potentially resulting in a denial of service. This affects programs that use mime/multipart.Reader.ReadForm, as well as form parsing in the net/http package with the Request methods FormFile, FormValue, ParseMultipartForm, and PostFormValue. With fix, ReadForm now does a better job of estimating the memory consumption of parsed forms, and performs many fewer short-lived allocations. In addition, the fixed mime/multipart.Reader imposes the following limits on the size of parsed forms: 1. Forms parsed with ReadForm may contain no more than 1000 parts. This limit may be adjusted with the environment variable GODEBUG=multipartmaxparts=. 2. Form parts parsed with NextPart and NextRawPart may contain no more than 10,000 header fields. In addition, forms parsed with ReadForm may contain no more than 10,000 header fields across all parts. This limit may be adjusted with the environment variable GODEBUG=multipartmaxheaders=.
Max CVSS
7.5
EPSS Score
0.27%
Published
2023-04-06
Updated
2023-11-25
Calling any of the Parse functions on Go source code which contains //line directives with very large line numbers can cause an infinite loop due to integer overflow.
Max CVSS
7.5
EPSS Score
0.07%
Published
2023-04-06
Updated
2023-11-25
Templates do not properly consider backticks (`) as Javascript string delimiters, and do not escape them as expected. Backticks are used, since ES6, for JS template literals. If a template contains a Go template action within a Javascript template literal, the contents of the action can be used to terminate the literal, injecting arbitrary Javascript code into the Go template. As ES6 template literals are rather complex, and themselves can do string interpolation, the decision was made to simply disallow Go template actions from being used inside of them (e.g. "var a = {{.}}"), since there is no obviously safe way to allow this behavior. This takes the same approach as github.com/google/safehtml. With fix, Template.Parse returns an Error when it encounters templates like this, with an ErrorCode of value 12. This ErrorCode is currently unexported, but will be exported in the release of Go 1.21. Users who rely on the previous behavior can re-enable it using the GODEBUG flag jstmpllitinterp=1, with the caveat that backticks will now be escaped. This should be used with caution.
Max CVSS
9.8
EPSS Score
0.08%
Published
2023-04-06
Updated
2023-11-25
The go command may generate unexpected code at build time when using cgo. This may result in unexpected behavior when running a go program which uses cgo. This may occur when running an untrusted module which contains directories with newline characters in their names. Modules which are retrieved using the go command, i.e. via "go get", are not affected (modules retrieved using GOPATH-mode, i.e. GO111MODULE=off, may be affected).
Max CVSS
9.8
EPSS Score
0.14%
Published
2023-06-08
Updated
2023-11-25
On Unix platforms, the Go runtime does not behave differently when a binary is run with the setuid/setgid bits. This can be dangerous in certain cases, such as when dumping memory state, or assuming the status of standard i/o file descriptors. If a setuid/setgid binary is executed with standard I/O file descriptors closed, opening any files can result in unexpected content being read or written with elevated privileges. Similarly, if a setuid/setgid program is terminated, either via panic or signal, it may leak the contents of its registers.
Max CVSS
7.8
EPSS Score
0.06%
Published
2023-06-08
Updated
2023-11-25
The go command may execute arbitrary code at build time when using cgo. This may occur when running "go get" on a malicious module, or when running any other command which builds untrusted code. This is can by triggered by linker flags, specified via a "#cgo LDFLAGS" directive. The arguments for a number of flags which are non-optional are incorrectly considered optional, allowing disallowed flags to be smuggled through the LDFLAGS sanitization. This affects usage of both the gc and gccgo compilers.
Max CVSS
9.8
EPSS Score
0.14%
Published
2023-06-08
Updated
2023-11-25
The go command may execute arbitrary code at build time when using cgo. This may occur when running "go get" on a malicious module, or when running any other command which builds untrusted code. This is can by triggered by linker flags, specified via a "#cgo LDFLAGS" directive. Flags containing embedded spaces are mishandled, allowing disallowed flags to be smuggled through the LDFLAGS sanitization by including them in the argument of another flag. This only affects usage of the gccgo compiler.
Max CVSS
9.8
EPSS Score
0.13%
Published
2023-06-08
Updated
2023-11-25
The HTTP/1 client does not fully validate the contents of the Host header. A maliciously crafted Host header can inject additional headers or entire requests. With fix, the HTTP/1 client now refuses to send requests containing an invalid Request.Host or Request.URL.Host value.
Max CVSS
6.5
EPSS Score
0.07%
Published
2023-07-11
Updated
2023-11-25
Extremely large RSA keys in certificate chains can cause a client/server to expend significant CPU time verifying signatures. With fix, the size of RSA keys transmitted during handshakes is restricted to <= 8192 bits. Based on a survey of publicly trusted RSA keys, there are currently only three certificates in circulation with keys larger than this, and all three appear to be test certificates that are not actively deployed. It is possible there are larger keys in use in private PKIs, but we target the web PKI, so causing breakage here in the interests of increasing the default safety of users of crypto/tls seems reasonable.
Max CVSS
5.3
EPSS Score
0.06%
Published
2023-08-02
Updated
2023-11-25
The html/template package does not properly handle HTML-like "" comment tokens, nor hashbang "#!" comment tokens, in <script> contexts. This may cause the template parser to improperly interpret the contents of <script> contexts, causing actions to be improperly escaped. This may be leveraged to perform an XSS attack.
Max CVSS
6.1
EPSS Score
0.08%
Published
2023-09-08
Updated
2023-11-25
The html/template package does not apply the proper rules for handling occurrences of "<script", "<!--", and "</script" within JS literals in <script> contexts. This may cause the template parser to improperly consider script contexts to be terminated early, causing actions to be improperly escaped. This could be leveraged to perform an XSS attack.
Max CVSS
6.1
EPSS Score
0.06%
Published
2023-09-08
Updated
2023-11-25
The go.mod toolchain directive, introduced in Go 1.21, can be leveraged to execute scripts and binaries relative to the root of the module when the "go" command was executed within the module. This applies to modules downloaded using the "go" command from the module proxy, as well as modules downloaded directly using VCS software.
Max CVSS
9.8
EPSS Score
0.13%
Published
2023-09-08
Updated
2023-11-25
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